stay well 2022 teen vaccine log FINALRS


CME Introduction Page

This project aims to improve the quality of primary care practice to promote vaccinations uptake through the use of strong, presumptive language to offer consistent recommendations that highlight disease/cancer prevention and reduce vaccine hesitancy.  The #StayWell: A Teen Vaccination Quality Improvement Learning Collaborative is constructed on strategically developed CME modules developed by the Alabama Child Health Improvement Alliance (ACHIA) to improve HPV Vaccination Series Completion (dose 1 and dose 2) for patients 9 – 12 years old, improve vaccine completion of Tdap for patients 11 - 12-year-old, and improve vaccine completion of MenACWY for patients 11 - 12-year-old. The project will recruit 15 – 20 Alabama clinics who will each identify a core QI team, containing two to four individuals, capable of fulfilling four roles: Lead Clinician, Clinical or Office Support Staff Person, Office Manager, and Data Coordinator.  Led by the ACHIA, practice teams will have access to specialists in adolescent medicine to deliver vaccine content and delivery (Tdap, HPV, MenACWY, and COVID); quality improvement coaches for practice engagement; a family representative, and a community-based pediatric physician champion.  To supplement administration of vaccines, practice teams will access to current coding and vaccine administration information. 

ACHIA is pleased to offer its StayWell 2022: A Teen Vaccine QI Learning Collaborative as an on-demand, CME-approved "enduring materials" module for Teen Vaccinations. Visit the #StayWell 2022: A Teen Vaccine QI Learning Collaborative module listed below for full details on how to access the training module, take the post-test on the material you reviewed, and access the CME activity evaluation. The module has an introduction, learning objectives, and speaker’s disclosure.

Faculty

  • Tamara Coyne-Beasley, MD, MPH, Professor, Derroll M. Dawkins, M.D. Endowed Chair in Adolescent Medicine, Vice Chair for Community Engagement, University of Alabama at Birmingham

  • David Kimberlin, MD, FAAP, Department of Pediatrics Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases University of Alabama at Birmingham

  • Gregory Zimet, PhD, FSAHM, Professor of Pediatrics & Clinical Psychology, Co-Director, IUPUI Center for HPV Research, Division of Adolescent Medicine | Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University.

  • Marietta Vazquez, MD, FAAP, Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics); Pediatric Global Health Track Director, Yale University School of Medicine

  • Cason Benton, MD, FAAP, Professor, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pediatrics, General Pediatrics.

Planners’ Disclosures

The following Planners of this enduring material have nothing to disclose:

  • E. Cason Benton, MD, FAAP, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham

  • Linda Champion, MPA, Project Manager, Alabama Child Health Improvement Alliance 

Content Reviewers Disclosures

The following Content Reviewer(s) of this enduring material have nothing to disclose:

  • E. Cason Benton, MD, FAAP, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham

  • Linda Champion, MPA, Project Manager, Alabama Child Health Improvement Alliance

Content Review

Content Review was conducted prior to the release of this enduring material and considered compliant with the standards listed below.

Children’s of Alabama requires that:

  • Content is free from bias in favor of a specific product or service of a commercial interest.  A commercial interest is any entity producing, marketing, re-selling or distributing healthcare goods or services consumed by or used on patients.

  • Slides do not contain any advertising, trade names corporate logos or a product-group message.

  • Generic names are used when discussing therapeutic options or if trade names are used then those of several companies are listed.

  • All recommendations involving clinical medicine are based on evidence that is accepted within the profession of medicine as adequate justification for their indications and contraindications in the care of patients.

  • All scientific research referred to, reported or used in support of justification of a patient care recommendation conform to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection and analysis.

Speakers Disclosures

Tamara Coyne-Beasley, MD MPH

  • Does not intend to discuss any commercial products or services.

  • Does not intend to discuss non-FDA approved uses of products/providers of services

  • I have served on external scientific advisory boards for Pfizer, Moderna, Dynavax and Sanofi Pasteur in the past 12 months

  • Any information presented will be consistent with recommendations of the ACIP and professional organizations 

David Kimberlin, MD, FAAP

  • Does intend to discuss commercial products or services

  • Does not intend to discuss non-FDA approved uses of products/providers of services

  • I do have a relevant financial relationship with the manufacturers of commercial products and/or providers of commercial services discussed in this CME activity.

    • Site PI on Gilead PK/PD study of remdesivir in pediatric population

    • All monies go directly to my university and not to me.

Gregory Zimet, PhD, FSAHM

  • Does not intend to discuss any commercial products or services

  • Does not intend to discuss non-FDA approved uses of products/providers of services

  • Discloses a financial relationship with Merck as a paid consultant and external Advisory Board Member related to HPV vaccination and with Moderna as an Advisory Board Member related to COVID-19 vaccination 

Marietta Vazquez, MD, FAAP

  • Does not intend to  discuss commercial products or services

  • Does not  intend to discuss non-FDA approved uses of products/providers of services

  • Does not have a relevant financial relationship with any commercial interests.

Commercial Support

This activity does not recieve funding from any ineligible company. An ineligible company is any entity producing, marketing, selling, re-selling or distributing healthcare goods or services consumed by, or used on, patients. 

Disclaimer Statement

This Internet Enduring Material activity does not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, policies or procedures of the Alabama Chapter-American Academy of Pediatrics, Children’s of Alabama, or its staff or representatives. Alabama Child Health Improvement Alliance cannot and does not assume any responsibility for the use, misuse or misapplication of any information.

MOC Statement 

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the learner to earn up to 2.5 MOC Part 2 points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program.  It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit learner completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.

Designation Statement

Children’s of Alabama designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Accreditation Statement

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Medical Association of the State of Alabama through the joint providership of Children's of Alabama and the Alabama Child Health Improvement Alliance.  Children's of Alabama is accredited by the Medical Association of the State of Alabama to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Please note that effective July 1, 2011, enduring materials are required to provide an assessment of the learner that measures achievement of the educational purpose and/or objectives of the activity.  Upon completion of this activity, you will be directed to the post-test.  To receive your CME certificate, you must score a minimum of 75% on the test.

Instructions

In each of the individual educational modules listed below, you will find instructions on how to access the modules, take a post-test on the material you reviewed, and access the CME activity evaluation. Each module also has an introduction, learning objectives, and speaker’s disclosure. To get started, click on any individual link below. If you are participating in the MOC activity all modules must be completed on the schedule outlined below.

Credit Assignment Criteria: Upon completion of the activity and successfully passing the post test, you will be sent a MOC Part 2 Claim form to complete and return back to Linda Champion at lchampion@alaap.org. On this form you will be required to enter your American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) Diplomate number*) and date of birth (MM/DD). Your ABP Diplomate number can be found in your ABP online profile. If you are unable to locate this number, you may look it up by clicking here or please contact the American Board of Pediatrics [Telephone: (919) 929-0461, Business Hours: (8:30 am – 5:00 pm ET Monday – Friday), E-mail: abpeds@abpeds.org].

*Please note that your American Academy of Pediatrics member ID number is not accepted for MOC Part 2 credit reporting.

Please allow up to 7 business days for MOC Part 2 credit to be accessible in your ABP Diplomate Profile.

Your credit will be entered into the ACCME’s Program and Activity Reporting System (PARS), this system will transfer your credit into your ABP profile. 

Within 30 days after you finish a MOC Part 2 activity that is approved for ABP’s MOC Part 2 credit, your Part 2 points will appear automatically in your ABP Portfolio, MOC Part 2 credit.. CME providers are responsible for reporting your completion to the ABP within 30 days. You do not have to send separate documentation to the ABP.


Before December 2,2021, for QI Collaborative 

  • ACHIA QI CME Modules: 

Overview of the Collaborative: Tamera Coyne-Beasley, MD, MPH, FAAP, FSAHM, Derrol Dawkins, MD Endowed Chair in Adolescent Medicine, Professor of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, Division Director, UAB Adolescent Medicine, Vice Chair, Pediatrics for Community Engagement 

Before February 17, 2022, for QI Collaborative 

  • ACHIA QI CME Modules

Vaccine Basics for COVID (as of August 2021): David Kimberlin, MD, FAAP 
Vaccine for Adolescents: Marietta Vazquez, MD FAAP, Professor of Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine 

Before April 21, 2022, for QI Collaborative 

  • ACHIA QI CME Modules 

Effective and efficient adolescent vaccine communication strategies for busy practitioners: Gregory Zimet, PhD, Professor of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine  
Disparities in Vaccine Preventable Diseases-The HPV Example:  Tamera Coyne-Beaslye, MD, MPH, FAAP, FSAHM, Derrol Dawkins, MD Endowed Chair in Adolescent Medicine, Professor of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, Division Director, UAB Adolescent Medicine, Vice Chair, Pediatrics for Community Engagement 


Modules

1 – "Stay Well 2020: A Teen Vaccine QI Collaborative Overview” Tamara Coyne-Beasley, MD, MPH, Professor, Derroll M. Dawkins, M.D. Endowed Chair in Adolescent Medicine, Vice Chair for Community Engagement, University of Alabama at Birmingham. Required for MOC. (Video Time: 15 min)
Click Here

2 – " Disparities in Vaccine Preventable Diseases: The HPV Example” Tamara Coyne-Beasley, MD, MPH, Professor, Derroll M. Dawkins, M.D. Endowed Chair in Adolescent Medicine, Vice Chair for Community Engagement, University of Alabama at Birmingham. Required for MOC. (Video Time: 24 min)
Click Here

3 – “Vaccine Basics for COVID” David Kimberlin, MD, FAAP, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham “Required for MOC.  Required for MOC  (Video Time: 44 min)
Click Here

4 – “Effective and efficient adolescent vaccine communication strategies for busy practitioners” Gregory Zimet, PhD, FSAHM, Professor of Pediatrics & Clinical Psychology, Co-Director, IUPUI Center for HPV Research,  Division of Adolescent Medicine | Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University. Required for MOC.  (Video Time: 31 min)
Click Here

5 – “Vaccines for Adolescents”  Marietta Vazquez Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics); Pediatric Global Health Track Director, Yale School of Medicine (Video Time: 35 min)
Click Here